An overview of labor immigrants and urban life in the 19th century of untied states

In the same way that a single carcass was picked apart by men with specialized jobs as it moved along a line, mounted upon a hook, Ford arranged his new factory at Highland Park so that men with highly specialized assignments could build an automobile much faster than before.

38b. The Underside of Urban Life

Office buildings, retail shops, and light manufacturing characterized the central business districts. The data they collected helped bring about changes in building codes, improved health care and factory safety, and highlighted the need for new child labor laws.

All of the Irish and many of the Germans were Roman Catholic. Californians had agitated for the new law, blaming the Chinese, who were willing to work for less, for a decline in wages.

This saved both time and money. This has led to increased professionalization of city police forces, including more weapons, increased training, and higher educational requirements for officers.

Unlike the Irish, many Germans had enough money to journey to the Midwest in search of farmland and work. High rents, low wages, and poor services produced misery in the midst of unprecedented economic growth.

Industrialization and Urbanization in the United States, 1880–1929

Given these attitudes toward foreigners, it is not surprising that calls for restrictions on immigration began to sound. As trolley or subway lines extended beyond what used to be the city limits, the first suburbs were created, resulting in residential segregation by income.

The building codes that went into effect after the fire required that all new construction use noncombustible materials.

25f. Irish and German Immigration

Since people preferred electric light to gas, it became increasingly popular, as the grid expanded and the costs dropped. Markets, shops, taverns, and concert halls provided services and entertainment. Replacing putrid gas lamps also made the smell of factories better for the workmen who worked there.

As jobs in cities disappeared, cities began to shrink. Charitable assistance was encouraged by the Social Gospel, a philosophy embraced by a number of Protestant ministers, which noted that personal salvation came through the betterment of society and that churches could help bring this about by fighting poverty, slum conditions, and drunkenness.

The growth of cities outpaced the ability of local governments to extend clean water, garbage collection, and sewage systems into poorer areas, so conditions in cities deteriorated.

The Rise of Urban America

Steel skeletons meant that the unornamented higher sections of a building could be worked on even before the inevitable elaborate ornamental fringes on the lower part of the building were finished. Workers had to commute by car.

Inimmigration at Ellis Island reached its peak with 1, immigrants arriving. Chicago became the home of the skyscraper because of the disastrous fire of that destroyed most of the central business district.

The earliest engines were large and prohibitively expensive for all but the largest firms. As the young and the more affluent seek the newest housing developments, tax bases in the cities and in older suburbs erode.

By more than a third of urban dwellers owned their own homes, one of the highest rates in the world at the time. Commuting into the city to work became easier and cheaper in the late 19th century, when commuter railroad lines were built, radiating out from the central city.

Cheap newspapers exaggerated increases in crime with sensational stories. Among the other manufacturers that used Fordist principles during the s were the makers of home appliances, like refrigerators and radios.

The demands of structural steel encouraged steelmakers like Andrew Carnegie to redesign entire factories, most notably replacing older Bessemer converters with the open-hearth process.

Overpeople starved to death. More than 12 million immigrants entered the United States through Ellis Island during its years of operation from to The middle classes lived a little farther from the center, and other poor people lived in the suburbs, farther from the economic and governmental centers and away from urban amenities such as town watches, water pumps, and garbage collection.

In the same way that employers and city planners depended upon streetcars to move people, manufacturers became more dependent upon railroads, afterto move their finished products. For example, Atlanta experienced a rapid economic recovery in the last quarter of the century, and Los Angeles became a boomtown in the s due to the Southern Pacific and Santa Fe railroads.

He would make a market for his cars by producing them so cheaply that nearly every American could afford one.

38b. The Underside of Urban Life

The rise in drug use since the s increased the incidence of violent crime, most visibly in cities, although the majority of drug customers are from the suburbs. The data they collected helped bring about changes in building codes, improved health care and factory safety, and highlighted the need for new child labor laws.

Tuberculosis was a huge killer. Old industries expanded and many new ones, including petroleum refining, steel manufacturing, and electrical power, emerged. They became involved in almost every labor-intensive endeavor in the country. Immigrants built canals and constructed railroads.

Lessons in This Unit. 19th Century American Ideas About Other Peoples and urban life in the late 19th century as well as a unit focused on Chinese immigration. and deal with issues of social and cultural diversity and national identity.

The Exclusion Act represented the first effort of the United States government to regulate or limit. Upward mobility, home ownership, educational opportunities, and cheap goods softened many of the disadvantages of 19th-century urban life.

Beautification programs, electrification, and construction of libraries, parks, playgrounds, and swimming pools, gradually improved the quality of urban life in the 20th century, although poor areas received fewer benefits.

The labor force that made industrialization possible was made up of millions of newly arrived immigrants and even larger numbers of migrants from rural areas.

Chinese Immigration to the United States, City Life in the Late 19th Century; Rural Life in the Late 19th Century; Railroads in the Late 19th Century; Work in the Late. Which of the following was NOT true of the American labor movement in the late 19th century? Labor's rights were protected by laws of Congress.

Which of the following is a correct statement about immigration from ? People Urbanization of America The early United States was predominately rural. and cheap goods softened many of the disadvantages of 19th-century urban life.

Beautification programs, electrification, and construction of libraries, parks, playgrounds, and swimming pools, gradually improved the quality of urban life in the 20th century. Although historians distinguish between the “old” (pre‐) and “new” (post‐) immigration in terms of the immigrants' countries of origin, it is a somewhat arbitrary distinction; immigrants from the Balkans and Russia were in the United States early in the century, and Irish and Germans continued to .

An overview of labor immigrants and urban life in the 19th century of untied states
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Background Essay on Late 19th and Early 20th Century Immigration · HERB: Resources for Teachers