Aristotle and friendship 3

On the other hand, Aristotle does not mean to imply that every pleasure should be chosen. Though the general point of view expressed in each work is the same, there are many subtle differences in organization and content as well.

But the son, if he is wicked, will naturally avoid aiding his father, or not be zealous about it; for most people wish to get benefits, but avoid doing them, as a thing unprofitable.

The virtue of magnificence is superior to mere liberality, and similarly greatness of soul is a higher excellence than the ordinary virtue that has to do with honor.

Rather, the values are shared in the sense that they are most fundamentally their values, at which they jointly arrive by deliberating together.

Nonetheless, an excellent juror can be described as someone who, in trying to arrive at the correct decision, seeks to express the right degree of concern for all relevant considerations. It is odd that pleasure receives two lengthy treatments; no other topic in the Ethics is revisited in this way.

The best standard is the one adopted by the Aristotle and friendship 3 the second-best is the one adopted by the political leader. Yet such an upbringing can take us only so far. Someone who has practical wisdom will recognize that he needs friends and other resources in order to exercise his virtues over a long period of time.

Aristotle assumes that when someone systematically makes bad decisions about how to live his life, his failures are caused by psychological forces that are less than fully rational. Similarly, when he says that murder and theft are always wrong, he does not mean that wrongful killing and taking are wrong, but that the current system of laws regarding these matters ought to be strictly enforced.

Aristotle's Ethics

Emotion challenges reason in all three of these ways. Furthermore, when he has decided what to do, he does not have to contend with internal pressures to act otherwise.

So too does friendship for the sake of utility; for the good are also useful to each other. Goodness is an enduring quality, so friendships based on goodness tend to be long lasting.

But what is not inevitable is that our early experience will be rich enough to provide an adequate basis for worthwhile ethical reflection; that is why we need to have been brought up well. The happiest life is lived by someone who has a full understanding of the basic causal principles that govern the operation of the universe, and who has the resources needed for living a life devoted to the exercise of that understanding.

All of the normal difficulties of ethical life remain, and they can be solved only by means of a detailed understanding of the particulars of each situation. The friendship of brothers has the characteristics found in that of comrades and especially when these are goodand in general between people who are like each other, inasmuch as they belong more to each other and start with a love for each other from their very birth, and inasmuch as those born of the same parents and brought up together and similarly educated are more akin in character; and the test of time has been applied most fully and convincingly in their case.

Now this seems to be a correct form of government, but the Persian type is perverted; for the modes of rule appropriate to different relations are diverse. All free males are born with the potential to become ethically virtuous and practically wise, but to achieve these goals they must go through two stages: But perhaps not all the greatest goods; for it is for himself most of all that each man wishes what is good.

We cannot say that what people wish for is good by definition, and although we could say that what is wished for is always what appears good, this will still be very variable. A impetuosity caused by pleasure, B impetuosity caused by anger, C weakness caused by pleasure D weakness caused by anger.

Therefore those who love for the sake of utility love for the sake of what is good for themselves, and those who love for the sake of pleasure do so for the sake of what is pleasant to themselves, and not in so far as the other is the person loved but in so far as he is useful or pleasant. Although there is no possibility of writing a book of rules, however long, that will serve as a complete guide to wise decision-making, it would be a mistake to attribute to Aristotle the opposite position, namely that every purported rule admits of exceptions, so that even a small rule-book that applies to a limited number of situations is an impossibility.

The soul is analyzed into a connected series of capacities: As well, Aristotle believes that it is through friendship that cities are held together. That is why Aristotle says that what is judged pleasant by a good man really is pleasant, because the good man is the measure of things a15— The friendship of brothers is like that of comrades; for they are equal and of like age, and such persons are for the most part like in their feelings and their character.

In one of his most popular works, Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle discusses a variety of these subjects in order to find virtue and moral character. For they think that, as in a commercial partnership those who put more in get more out, so it should be in friendship.

For example, consider a juror who must determine whether a defendant is guilty as charged. Good men will be friends for their own sake, i. A defense of Aristotle would have to say that the virtuous person does after all aim at a mean, if we allow for a broad enough notion of what sort of aiming is involved.

Since activities differ with respect to goodness and badness, some being worth choosing, others worth avoiding, and others neither, the same is true of pleasures as well. In either case, it is the exercise of an intellectual virtue that provides a guideline for making important quantitative decisions.

Friendship in Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics, Books 8 & 9. Friendshipis a virtue and is besides most necessary with a view to living. Without friends no one would choose to. Aristotle figured there were three kinds of friendships.

1) Friendships of utility: exist between you and someone who is useful to you in some elleandrblog.com instance, perhaps you're friendly with your. Aristotle on Friendship. In the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle describes friendship as reciprocated goodwill.

But it is the source of that goodwill that differentiates perfect friendship from two imperfect forms of friendship. With true friendship, friends love each other for their own sake, and they wish good things for each other.

The Nicomachean Ethics (/ ˌ n ɪ k oʊ ˈ m æ k i ə n /; Ancient Greek: Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια) is the name normally given to Aristotle's best-known work on ethics.

The work, which plays a pre-eminent role in defining Aristotelian ethics, consists of ten books, originally separate scrolls, and is understood to be based on notes.

In speaking of this sort of friendship, Aristotle seems to have in mind primarily a sort of business or commercial relationship.

It is the lowest of the three types of friendship and is the least enduring. Aristotle on Friendship Essay Words | 3 Pages Aristotle On Friendship Philosophical Ethics December 6, Friendship is undoubtedly one of the most important elements in the books of Aristotle's ethical principles.

Aristotle's Ethics Aristotle and friendship 3
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SparkNotes: Nicomachean Ethics: Book VIII